History of Lincoln Center: the 1960s

  • February 15, 1960
    The Repertory Theater Association, Inc. becomes a constituent.

  • June 19, 1960
    The Lincoln Center Youth Program (also known as the Lincoln Center Student Program) is begun in cooperation with the New York City Board of Education. It provides increased opportunities for thousands of students to enjoy music, opera, and drama.

  • January 4, 1961
    John D. Rockefeller 3rd resigns as President of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. and is elected Chairman of the Board. He serves in this position until May 11, 1970.

  • January 4, 1961
    General Maxwell D. Taylor is named the second President of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. Recalled to active military duty on July 1, 1961, he resigns on July 10, 1961, to become the military representative to President John F. Kennedy.

  • April 5, 1961
    Lincoln Center signs an agreement with the New York 1964-65 World's Fair to become the Fair's "performing arts arm."

  • June 26, 1961
    Edgar B. Young is named Acting President of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. He serves in this position until December 31, 1961.

  • January 1, 1962
    William Schuman is named the third President of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. He serves in this position until December 5, 1968.

  • August 20, 1962
    The first poster in the List Poster Program goes on sale. The artist, Ben Shahn, designed the poster to commemorate the opening of Philharmonic Hall.

  • September 23, 1962
    Philharmonic Hall opens. The architect is Max Abramovitz of Harrison & Abramovitz.

  • October 21, 1962
    The New York Music Theater, Inc. becomes a constituent.

  • September 10, 1963
    The New York Film Festival opens in Philharmonic Hall.

  • April 6, 1964
    The Lincoln Center Fountain opens. The architect is Philip Johnson of Philip Johnson Associates.

  • April 23, 1964
    The New York State Theater opens. The architect is Philip Johnson of Philip Johnson Associates.

  • April 12, 1965
    The City Center of Music and Drama, Inc., an independent corporation encompassing the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera, becomes a constituent.

  • September 1, 1965
    Henry Moore's "Reclining Figure" in Lincoln Center's North Plaza is officially presented.

  • October 14, 1965
    The Vivian Beaumont Theater and the Forum open. The architect is Eero Saarinen of Eero Saarinen & Associates.

  • October 17, 1965
    Great Performers begins with soprano Birgit Nilsson's opening night performance.

  • November 15, 1965
    Alexander Calder's sculpture "Le Guichet" is dedicated and presented to the people of New York City.

  • November 26, 1965
    The New York Public Library becomes a constituent.

  • November 30, 1965
    The Library & Museum of the Performing Arts opens. The architect is Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.

  • August 1, 1966
    Midsummer Serenades - A Mozart Festival begins. This program, the first indoor music festival in the United States, is made possible by Lincoln Center's new, air-conditioned halls.

  • September 16, 1966
    The Metropolitan Opera House opens. The architect is Wallace K. Harrison of Harrison & Abramovitz.

  • June 12, 1967
    Lincoln Center Festival '67, an international presentation of all the performing arts, opens.

  • June 26, 1968
    John Mazzola is appointed Chief Executive Officer of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. His title changes to Managing Director on April 14, 1970. He is named the fourth President of Lincoln Center on May 16, 1977, and serves until December 31, 1982.

  • May 22, 1969
    Damrosch Park and the Guggenheim Band Shell open. The band shell was designed by Eggers & Higgins, Architects.

  • September 11, 1969
    Alice Tully Hall opens. The primary architect is Pietro Belluschi. The associate architects are Helge Westermann and Eduardo Catalano.

  • October 26, 1969
    The Juilliard School opens. The primary architect is Pietro Belluschi. The associate architects are Helge Westermann and Eduardo Catalano.